Research Questions

Greenway field site

We use both field research and our campus laboratories to try to better understand nature in and around our small town. The majority of our field research projects take place at our outdoor field station, which is a large, city-owned greenway space. We have also utilized Allison Woods, a privately owned nature reserve, for some projects.

Our research questions tend to center around interesting things we observe at our field station. Projects may be different from semester to semester as we work with different groups of students. The main questions are as follows:

Movement of animals in urban and suburban environments
Do animals, specifically mammals (i.e. deer, coyotes, red fox, grey fox, raccoons, opossums, grey squirrels), move differently when they are in and around urban environments? We are interested in using camera traps to look for patterns of animal movement in and around Statesville, NC. We would really like to better understand how animals are using the greenway trails and spaces throughout town.

DNA barcoding and insect diversity
How does the richness and/or evenness of insects differ in an area that gets a lot of “foot-traffic” compared to a more natural area? We are using measuring insect diversity on campus as well as at our research station. We are using both field guides as well as DNA barcoding for identification.

Post-anoxic behaviors of the eastern subterranean termite, Reticulitermes flavipes
Populations of R. flavipes are widespread throughout most of the eastern United States. Eastern subterranean termites are important to the recycling of essential nutrients in forest ecosystems. However, they also cause damage to wooden structures, including houses. Subterranean termites have the ability to survive flooding conditions by lowering their metabolism. This may decrease the activity of termites in areas with high amounts of rainfall. We investigate the connection between the ability of termites to lower their metabolism to survive floods and their feeding behavior

Biodiversity, ecology, and natural history of the barred owl, Strix varia, and the great-horned owl, Bubo virginianis
Our field station has given us a tremendous opportunity to observe and study both barred owls as well as great-horned owls. We have studied social, hunting, and nesting behaviors with the help of motion-activated cameras and videos. We calculated the Habitat Suitability Index for both species. We have also been able to investigate how both of their niches overlap.

 

Advertisements